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johnmortara:

hiiii!!!! i’m guest-editing for a very special issue of Big Lucks!!!!
things that i’m stoked about:
reading submissions blind — this is a thing i don’t usually get to do at voicemail poems because of how it’s set up.
finding cool writers that maybe not a lot of people have seen work from yet
being able to say a little bit about their work and why i picked it
allowing people that missed out on me guest-editing at that other zine to send me their stuff still
working with mark on something really special and neato for the web
please send me your work i am very excite to see it!
full guidelines and whatnot here!

Get your work to John by October 31st.

johnmortara:

hiiii!!!! i’m guest-editing for a very special issue of Big Lucks!!!!

things that i’m stoked about:

  • reading submissions blind — this is a thing i don’t usually get to do at voicemail poems because of how it’s set up.

  • finding cool writers that maybe not a lot of people have seen work from yet

  • being able to say a little bit about their work and why i picked it

  • allowing people that missed out on me guest-editing at that other zine to send me their stuff still

  • working with mark on something really special and neato for the web


please send me your work i am very excite to see it!

full guidelines and whatnot here!

Get your work to John by October 31st.

wednesday is me: a
bored ghost dropping lit candles into the
trashcan. people buying my bones for nothing.
wednesday is the pier i stood on after you
suggested that i should drown. wednesday is a
man screaming off of it.

John Mortara, “wednesday,” published in Big Lucks (via bostonpoetryslam)
Wastoid, the first-ever Big Lucks Book, is now available for preorder.
Praise for Wastoid:“A lover is obsessively identified and misidentified in Mathias Svalina’s breathlessly intense Wastoid. This lover is a praying mantis, morphs to predatory bird; this lover is a sadist, a romantic, an abstraction of winter, a mirror and tomb; this lover is dead, then mutates to other lovers. These prose poems move at ecstatic speed, compulsively rebuilding fantastical miniature worlds where a lover—Lazarus-like—dies and rises again, often leaving destruction in his wake. The more this love is defined, the more it feels unreachable and ineffable. These unforgettable poems are full of feverish imagination as well as gorgeous blood currents of anger and mourning that drive Wastoid deep into our consciousness.” — Cathy Park Hong, author of Empire Empire and Dance Dance Revolution“Mathias Svalina’s book is full of honey. It is full of sad honey, honey and swagger, a honeyed hope. The I in this book is sweet and the rest of the world is a Wastoid and I is left writing poem after poem obsessively trying to understand the disconnect between himself and the lover who is a Wastoid, too. Maybe the I can never understand the world. But the poems do—these tight little songs announcing themselves one after the other, bowling over the reader more and more as the book goes on. And after I read this book, I understood why it is OK to die.” — Dorothea Lasky, author of Rome and Thunderbird

Wastoid, the first-ever Big Lucks Book, is now available for preorder.

Praise for Wastoid:

“A lover is obsessively identified and misidentified in Mathias Svalina’s breathlessly intense Wastoid. This lover is a praying mantis, morphs to predatory bird; this lover is a sadist, a romantic, an abstraction of winter, a mirror and tomb; this lover is dead, then mutates to other lovers. These prose poems move at ecstatic speed, compulsively rebuilding fantastical miniature worlds where a lover—Lazarus-like—dies and rises again, often leaving destruction in his wake. The more this love is defined, the more it feels unreachable and ineffable. These unforgettable poems are full of feverish imagination as well as gorgeous blood currents of anger and mourning that drive Wastoid deep into our consciousness.”
— Cathy Park Hong, author of Empire Empire and Dance Dance Revolution

“Mathias Svalina’s book is full of honey. It is full of sad honey, honey and swagger, a honeyed hope. The I in this book is sweet and the rest of the world is a Wastoid and I is left writing poem after poem obsessively trying to understand the disconnect between himself and the lover who is a Wastoid, too. Maybe the I can never understand the world. But the poems do—these tight little songs announcing themselves one after the other, bowling over the reader more and more as the book goes on. And after I read this book, I understood why it is OK to die.”
— Dorothea Lasky, author of Rome and Thunderbird